Is Freemasonry a Religion?

That is a question that is often asked about Freemasonry.

While some argue vehemently for or against this notion, I have often expressed my view on this question in this blog, that it  really doesn’t matter, since the result is the same;  if Freemasonry is unacceptable to God then a Christian should not be involved with it, whether it is deemed to be a religion or not. Simply arguing, (even arguing successfully) that Freemasonry is not a religion does not disaffirm or rebut all the problems a genuine Christian should have with it.

While this question may be brushed aside as irrelevant by many, it has utmost relevance to a person that is a Freemason and simultaneously claims to be Christian.

Most Masons, of course, passionately argue that Freemasonry is not a religion.

In this discussion I am taking the other viewpoint; what if Freemasonry really is a Religion? How does that affect the brother who claims to be a Christian?

To answer that question, let us first consider the question; what is a Religion?

Defining Religion is admittedly not an easy thing to do since it may mean so many different things to many different people, yet there is a traditional or conservative approach to the question that may bring us close to the core of the issue of defining what Religion really is.

Then, having defined Religion, we can compare it to Freemasonry and look for similarities.

One way of looking at defining religion that must be agreed upon by any reasonable person is that religion involves a deity or Supreme being mostly thought of as God or a god or gods and more so, it involves the relationship to, if not necessarily with, a deity or Supreme being, such as God or a god or gods, with humans.

An indispensable element in this relationship is an agreed upon set of values and beliefs involving codes of conduct and aims and objectives. It also addresses the metaphysical or spiritual end goal of being and the path to its realization (a plan of Salvation).

Another indispensable element would be “faith” in an unseen benevolent benefactor expressed in acts of worship like for example prayer and communal behaviour like collective song and ritual executed in an organized and planned manner involving regular gatherings at places of meeting organized and controlled by some form of clergy.

One could go on and on but I am certain that what I have described here is what most people would recognize as the basic components of a religion.

Now let us compare Freemasonry to the above and see what we get.

It is immediately evident that the first criteria is met in that Freemasonry indeed subscribe to a Supreme Being that it call the “Great Architect of the Universe.” Masonic ritual and other text books undeniably describe the masonic values, morals and rules of conduct in minute detail including its aims and objectives for this life and the life hereafter.

It describes in its ritual undeniably the masonic plan of salvation in that “the Lambskin (the masonic apron) is therefore to remind you (the mason) of that purity of life and rectitude of conduct which is so essentially necessary to your gaining admission to that Celestial Lodge above, where the Supreme Architect of the Universe presides.”

This is an expression of faith in the unseen Masonic god, the “Great Architect of the Universe” that is worshipped in Lodge (that is called a Temple) by prayer and song during regular gatherings run by the clergy, the Master and his deacons and officers.

If just by scratching the surface such startling resemblances to Religion can be established, how foolhardy does one have to be in order to persist in the argument that Freemasonry is not a religion when all the evidence so patently point to the obvious conclusion that it is?

No amount of denial can alter the facts that proof the obvious.

So where does this leave the Mason that claims to be a Christian? It leaves him in deep, deep water indeed. Let us examine Scripture in order to get all this in perspective.

We learn very clearly in Scripture that Jesus is the Way the Truth and the Light, and that nobody comes to the Father except through Him (John 14:6). Freemasonry flatly denies this in teaching that admittance to heaven can be gained by good works, making no mention of Jesus whatsoever!

This is in direct transgression to what Jesus teaches us in His Word.

9  Whoever transgresses and does not abide in the doctrine of Christ does not have God. He who abides in the doctrine of Christ has both the Father and the Son.   10  If anyone comes to you and does not bring this doctrine, do not receive him into your house nor greet him;   11  for he who greets him shares in his evil deeds. (2 John 1:9-11)

Beware lest anyone cheat you through philosophy and empty deceit, according to the tradition of men, according to the basic principles of the world, and not according to Christ. (Col 2:8  )

Freemasonry is a philosophy according to the tradition of man and since it is empty of Christ it is according to the principles of the world and not according to Christ!

For this reason Christians should avoid any involvement in or with Freemasonry since doing so involves the serious transgression of denying the doctrine of Christ and as we saw above, whosoever transgress thus does not abide in the doctrine of Christ and does not have God!

If you are a Mason and claim to be a Christian, please open your eyes and come out of there before it is too late! I know what I am talking about. I was a mason for 15 years before the Lord Jesus saved me.

May the Lord bless you with discernment, wisdom and courage to do the right thing, come out, come clean!

Blessings,

A.

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